JUNK science used to SUPPRESS this ‘swamp secret’ for upset stomach

Gut troubles are as old as mankind.

Since our prehistoric ancestors first emerged from the cave… and hunted or gathered something to eat… food has managed to turn against us at one time or another.

And when it does… when the rumblings set in and the pain and bloating won’t quit… nothing can feel more debilitating.

Or embarrassing.

That’s why we PRIZE anything that aids in our digestion.

It’s been that way since the beginning of time… in EVERY ancient culture.

But one of our best-known digestive aids… with the LONGEST track record… is on the U.S. government BLACKLIST.

And the feds aren’t budging.

The baby got thrown out with the bathwater

Perhaps calamus root (Acorus calamus) was named after Kalamos, a tragic figure in an ancient Greek epic poem who drowned in grief… and then transformed into a water reed.

Native to India, calamus grows in watery environments where you might expect to find cattails… like wetlands, marshes, and streams.

Known as sweetflag for its sweet scent, this “swamp root” might seem like an unlikely candidate for medicine…

But the reed’s root has been lauded for its healing powers by authors of ancient Chinese manuscripts… practitioners of Ayurvedic medicine… and the indigenous peoples of Western Canada.

It’s got centuries – if not MILLENNIA – of human experiencetouting its medicinal value.

Yet the FDA BANNED the use of calamus… and related products, like oils and extracts… in 1968.

Even now, 50 YEARS later, it still considers any food that contains calamus ADULTERATED.

And that means people with digestive issues are STUCK taking prescription and OTC drugs that may block excess acid… but don’t make you FEEL any better.

Some may even make you feel worse.

The feds blacklisted calamus because of the presence of a chemical called beta-asarone.

One animal study showed that beta-asarone might cause cancer.

But here’s what the feds WON’T tell you…

The kind of calamus plant that grows in North America contains ZERO beta-asarone.

And among the varieties of calamus found around the world that DO contain beta-asarone, the amount of it varies widely.

So yes, if a variety of calamus contains 96% beta-asarone, maybe restrict its consumption until we can establish a more confirmed safety profile.

But in one sweeping gesture, the FDA outlawed ALL of it… and NEVER looked back.

Once the ban took effect, research on calamus came to a screeching halt.

We’ve gathered NO NEW INFORMATION in the last half-century.

But we DID collect thousands of years’ worth of experience BEFORE the ban took effect.

We know that calamus helps calm a stormy stomach in two ways:

  1. relaxing your muscles and beating back spasms and cramps, and
  2. increasing stomach acid, as too LITTLE digestive juice is often the culprit of gut troubles, NOT too much.

Despite the federal ban on calamus, you can actually buy the dried root in powdered form. It even comes in organic varieties!

There’s a hitch…

You’re not supposed to ingest it. And no one is allowed to tell you how to prepare it as a tea… or anything else you could consume.

It’s more than legal, however, to add it to your bathwater or gargle with it.

Just beware of swallowing it.