[Shocking] Stop vision-robbing disease in its tracks with this BANNED berry

If you think that eating carrots can GUARANTEE crystal-clear vision… far into your “golden years”… you’re sadly MISTAKEN.

To make sure you don’t lose your sight – especially to a condition like glaucoma— you need to tap into fruits and vegetables that are darker than that orange hue.

WAY darker.

And there’s one fruit that’s so dark, it’s practically BLACK – which means it’s the EPITOME of vision-protecting potency.

Yet the feds found a way to BAN this berry… FOR DECADES.

And even though it’s no longer BLACKLISTED, too many seniors have already MISSED THE BOAT on this formerly forbidden fruit.

It’s not too late for you.

Here’s how to reap the benefits of this blockbuster berry… and make sure blindness NEVER takes hold.

A fall from grace

Blackcurrants (Ribes nigrum) are dark, tart berries that grow in the wild in parts of Europe and Asia.

In the 19th century, American farmers learned to cultivate them here, making them a widespread crop by the 1920s.

They were BANISHED from the U.S. when they got blamed for spreading a fungus to pine trees.

As a result, the feds ERADICATED them from our farms… produce aisles… and memory.

Yet depriving seniors of this vision-boosting powerhouse did more harm than good.

Because blackcurrants are so nutritious, they’re called the “King of Berries.”

They’re “jam”-packed with vitamins… including FOUR TIMES as much vitamin C as oranges… and TWICE the antioxidant power of blueberries.

And they get their vision-saving power from a high concentration of anthocyanins, which contribute so much purple pigment to this fruit that its appearance is dark as night.

When you’re in the crosshairs for glaucoma, you need as many of those nutrients you can get.

Blackcurrants contain no less than 15 different anthocyanins

And studies have shown that they can SAVE your vision from becoming a TOTAL LOSS.

They promote healthy eyesight in several ways, including:

  • increasing blood flow to your eyes
  • repairingcell damage (including nerve cells) and preventing cell death by clearing out free radicals
  • reducing eye fatigue, and
  • improving light sensitivity and night vision.

Now, the feds lifted the federal ban on blackcurrants in 1966, after pine trees were bred to resist the pesky fungal infection. Legalization is now up to individual states.

Most of them still refuse to allow blackcurrants to be grown on their soil.

It’s time for this king to take back its crown…

If you can find them locally, you can eat them fresh – but because they’re so rich in vitamin C, eating too many fresh blackcurrants can have a laxative effect.

Blackcurrant is also available nationally in powdered form as a capsule or drink mix… but shy away from Britain’s favorite blackcurrant drink, Ribena.

Its sugar content offsets its health benefits – and high blood sugar can cause or exacerbate glaucoma.