This is how useless statins really are

It’s one of the biggest and longest-running fables we’ve ever been told.

“High cholesterol causes heart disease.”

But to put it simply, it doesn’t — and that’s been known for over 80 years!

Yet this cholesterol myth has been repeated for so long and by so many that when a respected group of researchers recently attempted to burst its bubble, health authorities pounced upon them quicker than a cat on a mouse.

What these scientists have to say connects the dots to research started during the 1930s, and it leads us right to the all-important realization that taking a statin drug to prevent heart disease is basically all risk and no gain.


Forgotten research

While there have been plenty of studies demonstrating how cholesterol-lowering statin drugs can hurt you (which we’ve told you a lot about here in the eAlert), what professor Sherif Sultan from the University of Ireland recently said gets right to the heart of the matter:

“Lowering cholesterol with medications is a total waste of time.”

And now, we’ve got it right there in black and white: In a “detailed systematic review,” published in the journal BMJ Open, professor Sultan and his colleagues discovered that seniors who had high cholesterol were significantly healthier than those with lower readings!

Specifically, older people with high LDL (called the “bad” kind) “lived longer and had less heart disease.”

And there’s more!

The lead author of this study, an expert in renal medicine at Lund University in Sweden, went so far as to say that there’s “no reason” to try and lower LDL cholesterol.

As professor Sultan put it, cholesterol helps to keep you healthy by preventing conditions such as cancer and infections. In fact, he says, it’s one of the “most vital” molecules you can have in your body. On top of that, the researchers dared to say that the benefits of taking those cholesterol-lowering statins “have been exaggerated.”

Wow, those are some brave scientists!

Of course, these findings were immediately attacked from all sides. One academic said that the research came to the completely “wrong conclusion.” The British Heart Foundation released a statement saying that there’s nothing in the study to “support” those opinions.

But if these statin pushers knew some history here, they’d see that this is far from the first time the cholesterol/heart disease hypothesis has had some serious holes punched in it.

For example, way back in 1936, autopsy studies done on 123 people who didn’t die from heart disease clearly found “no relationship” between how much plaque was found in their arteries (called atherosclerosis) and cholesterol levels.

And again in 1962, autopsies conducted on 200 people found exactly the same thing.

Similar research was done yet again just 10 years ago, and guess what? Yep, researchers found that blood cholesterol levels “have little influence” on plaque in the arteries.

It’s hard to believe that this substantial body of evidence could be tossed by the wayside, as we’re repeatedly told that high cholesterol numbers make you a walking time bomb for heart disease.

Of course, the “cure” for that is to immediately start up on a statin like Lipitor or Crestor!

If these drugs, however, aren’t providing any benefits, then what are they doing?

Well, for starters… how about causing diabetes, cataracts, memory problems, severe muscle pain, fatigue, and cancer?

And the icing on this fat-free cake is that statins all on their own have been found to actually cause hardening of the arteries! How’s that for irony?

As we’ve been telling you, these drugs are horribly dangerous. And if you’re taking one, you urgently need to have a talk with your doctor about stopping.

Because in light of what we now know, continuing to take a statin is obviously much more than just a waste of time. It’s a terrible way to sabotage what should be the best years of your life.

“High cholesterol ‘does not cause heart disease’ new research finds, so treating with statins a ‘waste of time’” Henry Bodkin, The Telegraph, telegraph.co.uk