April 2002 - Health Sciences Institute - Official Site

Vitamin D may reduce the risk of heart disease

It may not get the popular press of its "cousins" C and E, but new research is showing us that vitamin D may reduce the risk of heart disease. That's right, in addition to keeping bones strong and reducing the effects of osteoporosis, a new study reports that vitamin D may protect women from heart disease.

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Writing on the wall

On March 13th the European Parliament – a 626-member legislative body representing the 15 European Union countries – passed the "EU Directive on Dietary Supplements," which classifies vitamins as medical drugs rather than food supplements. The Directive grants a transition period of three years for vitamin supplements already on the market. But in 2005, every EU country will be required to implement the Directive.

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Mercury rising

In two new studies, scientists found even more evidence that the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil can significantly improve cardiovascular health and cut your risk of heart attack in half.

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From the Yangtze to the Alps

For centuries, Traditional Chinese Medicine has taught that tea can be potent medicine. Modern alternative medicine has embraced that idea for years – and recently, even the mainstream has supported the benefits of tea. It's no wonder – research continues to reinforce that the antioxidants in tea can protect your heart, fight cancer, and prevent disease.

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Two heads that are no better than one

St. John's wort, the popular herbal supplement used for more than 2,000 years to take the edge off mild depression, got kicked around in the press last week. And it wasn't pretty.

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Precious metals

We've known for some time that resistance exercise can help increase bone density. But this new study from the University of Florida shows that resistance exercise can also have a dramatic impact on aerobic capacity – particularly in those of us who are over the age of 60.

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Change of heart

According to a disturbing new report from the Yale School of Medicine, our chances of suffering a stroke following a heart attack are much higher than doctors ever knew before – especially for patients 75 or older. In addition to age, the Yale scientists identified several other risk factors that can increase your chances of suffering a stroke – whether you've recently suffered a heart attack or not.

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