March 2002 - Health Sciences Institute - Official Site

Remicade and Enbrel

In an e-Alert dated exactly one year ago today ("More Bad News About Remicade and Enbrel" 1/29/02), I gave you the latest information on the disturbing side effects of two prescription drugs used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn's disease. Back then I said, "Unfortunately, the news gets even worse," and told you about research that showed both drugs may cause nerve damage that can lead to MS and other central nervous system disorders.

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More evidence of over-regulation

Why on earth would the Food and Drug Administration have regulations about a CD player?

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Mother Nature's acid trip

Those of us that choose organic foods usually do so because of what ISN'T in them – pesticides, growth hormones, and antibiotics, just to name a few choice chemicals. But new research suggests that we might get even more benefit from organically-grown fruits and vegetables because of what IS in them – a substance that might help protect us from heart attacks, strokes, and even cancer.

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Vioxx osteoarthritis pain

According to a new report, at least five Vioxx users found themselves putting their lives on hold instead – because the drug caused a life-threatening side effect.

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And now the other side of the room

I just came across some new research that addresses that question – and reinforces the value of the treadmill test for everyone. In two separate studies, researchers at Johns Hopkins University showed that the treadmill test is an accurate predictor for both men and women – and that the test may help reveal problems in patients who don't exhibit other traditional warning signs.

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Fade to black

Millions of men around the world have used Viagra to help them renew their romantic lives. But new research is showing that for some men, those re-ignited fireworks might come at a high price – a literal, and permanent, fade to black.

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The miracle life extension therapy that's totally free

If you were asked to name the most accurate predictor of a person's potential lifespan, what would you say? Smoking habits? Heart health? The presence of disease, like diabetes? All good guesses. But according to new research, it's none of the above.

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