February 2002 - Health Sciences Institute - Official Site

Is the NYT really an objective source for alternative health information

Reading the New York Times one morning, there was something that gave me pause. There, right in the Metro section, was an ad for a new book: "The New York Times Guide to Alternative Health." The subtitle read "A Consumer Reference." And the description went on to describe how this "timely and authoritative report" would inform us about "the most controversial" form of medical care in America with "balanced, objective reports."

Read more...

Grandma knew the secret for relieving arthritis pain

Most people think an "old wives' tale" is synonymous with silly, superstitious, useless information. But the fact is that women's oral tradition has passed on a lot of useful knowledge over the years.

Read more...

One small change you can make today to improve insulin sensitivity

In the Western world, the average daily intake per capita is about 300 mg – a little more than two cups of brewed coffee a day. Of course, it's also found in tea, sodas, chocolate, and hundreds of other foods in varying amounts. And according to new research, it may be contributing to the insulin resistance epidemic sweeping the world.

Read more...

Getting 8 hours? You may be sleeping TOO much

How many hours of sleep should you get each night for optimal health? If you're like me, your knee-jerk reaction to that question is "8 hours." But research is shedding new light on the conventional wisdom about sleep – and the new answers it provides may surprise you.

Read more...

HRT may quadruple your risk of deadly cancer

Now, there's another new study in the anti-HRT camp. This one strongly supports the long-held belief that HRT may increase a woman's risk of breast cancer – in fact, it shows that long-term HRT use may boost your odds of one of the most dangerous types of breast cancer by as much as 85 PERCENT.

Read more...

Mainstream's blindness on Macular Degeneration

One of our editors recently came across a study that appeared in the Archives of Ophthalmology late last year. The abstract states the study's objective: to describe the risk factors and associated population attributable risk for age-related maculopathy (ARM) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD), two common causes of vision loss among the elderly. It details its results, which found that ARM and AMD risk increased with age (no kidding), cigarette smoking, and the use of ACE inhibitor medications and cholesterol-lowering drugs.

Read more...

One thing you can do to protect yourself from Alzheimer's starting today

New research is strongly supporting the homocysteine-AD link – and doing so through a much larger, much more comprehensive trial.

Read more...