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If you act now, you can help guide the future of GM farming in America

You can help guide the future of GM farming in America.

That’s quite an amazing claim. Here’s why…

Monsanto, DuPont and other agri-business giants make millions off genetically modified crops. They would much rather you just eat their food and stay out of their business.

But their business — that is, our FOOD — is everyone’s business. And now we’ve come to a moment where the business of the entire GM industry is about to go down one road, or another.

Would you like to help choose the road?

Your California friends

There are three reasons the future of GM concerns you personally.

ONE. If you eat any processed foods, or if you eat in restaurants, then you consume GM ingredients. And by “restaurants” I don’t mean fast food. I mean EVERYthing, from McDonald’s to four-star steak houses.

That means nearly everyone eats GM every day.

TWO. Too many GM schemes produce environmental nightmares.

The e-mail I sent you yesterday was a response to the bizarre claim that GM farming might have green benefits. Ridiculous! Farmers get stuck with the devastating consequences of GM “innovations.”

For every imagined “green” benefit, there are plenty of GM disasters.

THREE. We have no idea what GM ingredients might be doing to our bodies.

In the early 1990s, the FDA decided there was no difference between GM food and conventionally raised food. So no safety testing was required.

Twenty years later, the agency says there’s no evidence that GM foods are harmful. And, of course, one of the reasons there’s no evidence is because NO SAFETY TESTING WAS REQUIRED!

FDA — asleep at the safety switch, as usual.

But in a recent study, rats that ate Monsanto’s Roundup Ready corn had a higher risk of cancer. And in another rat study with the same corn, liver and kidney function declined.

We don’t know if this corn would have the same effect on humans. But on the chance that it might, wouldn’t you like to be informed that the corn you’re about to buy is GM corn?

As I’ve mentioned before, food producers who use GM ingredients are not required to list GM sources on product packaging. Likewise, grocers don’t have to label bins of GM fruits or vegetables.

And that’s where you come in.

In a few days, California voters will vote on Proposition 37. This ballot initiative calls for food manufacturers to inform consumers when a food product contains GM ingredients.

Prop 37 isn’t a GM ban. It doesn’t restrict sales. It does one thing. If passed, it will require GM labels on GM food. That’s it. Simple. And yet, this will have an impact on your dinner table whether you live in California, Maine, or any spot in between.

If Prop 37 passes, food producers will probably label all their GM products, wherever they’re sold. For national brands, it will be too expensive to create one label for California and another label for the rest of the country.

Of course, if you DO live in Maine, you can’t vote in California. But your California friends can.

I think just about everybody has friends in California. This is a great time to make contact and encourage them to vote YES on Prop 37.

Californians — and all their friends across the U.S. — have the right to know if our food is GM. Easy as that. Just tell us.

You can learn more about Prop 37 on the Right to Know website (carighttoknow.org).

Sources:
“Could Prop. 37 Kill Monsanto’s GM Seeds?” Tom Philpott, Mother Jones, 10/10/12, motherjones.com

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