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Orange juice is a bad choice for type 2 diabetes prevention

Orange juice is a bad choice for type 2 diabetes prevention

Good news + bad advice = bad news

You may have heard about the recent study in which UK researchers found that middle- aged and older subjects with the highest levels of vitamin C were more that 60 percent less likely to develop type 2 diabetes compared to subjects with the lowest levels of the vitamin.

That’s the good news.

Now for the bad advice

When a local newscast here in Baltimore featured this study, the anchor introduced it by suggesting that a couple of glasses of orange juice every day might help prevent type 2 diabetes.

In fact, a glass of orange juice is practically a full day’s serving of type 2 diabetes!

And that’s why newsroom copywriters with a background in newsroom copywriting should not give nutrition advice.

The fruit of an orange is high in unrefined, water-soluble fiber. And that makes it very different (and healthier) than orange juice. Many types of fruit juices (such as orange, grapefruit and grape juices) actually contain as much sugar per serving as a soft drink.

Just a few days ago, in the e-Alert “Hilarity Ensues” (7/29/08), I told you about a Tulane School of Public Health study that analyzed dietary and medical records in more than 70,000 subjects. Results showed type 2 diabetes risk increased by nearly 20 percent among subjects who drank one serving of fruit juice daily.

The study also found that three daily servings of whole fruit LOWERED type 2 diabetes risk by about the same amount.

But that didn’t make the headlines in Baltimore.

Source:
“High Vitamin C Intake May Cut Diabetes Risk” Reuters Health, 8/7/08, reutershealth.com




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