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Is this deadly drug in your medicine cabinet?

You’ll remember that about three months ago, we told you how the NIH revised its cholesterol guidelines and, by doing so, recommended more patients begin taking dangerous cholesterol-lowering statin drugs. Well, it looks like the chickens have come home to roost.

As I was finishing the follow up on our milk piece, Jenny called to tell me that Bayer Pharmaceuticals just yanked their drug, Baycol, off the market. Used by 700,000 Americans, Baycol is one of the more popular statin drugs. Unfortunately, it has also been linked to 31 deaths in the U.S. and at least nine others abroad. Finally, after 40 fatalities, Bayer has decided the drug may not be safe.

As we’ve told you for years in the Members Alert and as recently as the May e-Alert, there is evidence that cholesterol isn’t the chief cause of heart disease – high homocysteine levels are. Nevertheless, cholesterol is a factor, and there are plenty of safe and effective natural alternatives. Profibe, a grapefruit pectin extract, which we covered in the May 2001 issue of Members Alert, can lower your cholesterol as much as 30 percent in three weeks.

Unlike Baycol, Profibe has no dangerous side effects. You can order it from Optimal Health Resources by calling (800)701-8648.

We’re also currently researching another promising natural cholesterol buster for a future issue. We’ll keep you updated as our research continues.

In the meantime, please don’t put your health at risk with potentially life-threatening drugs like Baycol. There are legitimate alternatives that are every bit as effective and won’t threaten the rest of your health.



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